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Ike Signs the NASA Act - Today in History

On July 29, 1958, President Dwight D. Eisenhower signed the National Aeronautics and Space Act of 1958 establishing the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA).  Woot!

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The National Aeronautics and Space act of 1958. 

President Eisenhower Presents NASA Commissions to Dr. T. Keith Glennan as the first administrator for NASA and Dr. Hugh L. Dryden as deputy administrator. Courtesty of NASA.

Statement by the President regarding H.R. 12575, the National Aeronautics and Space Act of 1958, July 29, 1958.

Explore the Early History and Development of NASA from the Eisenhower Library

The United States Congress passes The National Aeronautics and Space Act of 1958, Public Law 85-568, 72 STAT 426  formally inaugurating the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). Eisenhower signs it the same day.

On this day in history July 29, 1862: Acting in orders for her arrest ordered directly from the US Secretary of War Edwin Stanton, Confederate spy Marie Isabella “Belle” Boyd is arrested by Union troops and detained at the Old Capitol Prison in Washington, D.C. It was the first of three arrests for this skilled spy who provided crucial information to the Confederates during the war.

Time and again she would return to her spying activities for the Confederates even volunteering to run the Union blockade off the coast of North Carolina. She would be captured by Union sailors and in a twist of fate, she would instead of being jailed, she began a courtship with the officer who arrested her: Captain Samuel Hardinge (some sources list him as a Lieutenant and Ensign among other ranks).

She would make it to London with Captain Hardinge soon to follow. They would be wed in London. The union would be short lived as upon return to America, Hardinge would be jailed and brought up on charges of aiding and abetting the enemy. He died in prison. Boyd was widowed with a young daughter from her marriage with Hardinge and remained in England to write her memoirs: “Belle Boyd in Camp and Prison.”

After the war she parlayed her fame (or infamy depending on your point of view) into an acting career. In the late 1880’s she toured the south, describing her exploits as a Confederate spy in a stage show entitled "The Perils of a Spy" and herself as "Cleopatra of the Secession.".

She died in Wisconsin in 1900.

Click the following link for The digital version of her memoirs courtesy of Documenting the American South

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baseballsisco

baseballsisco:

On this day in Baseball History July 28, 1991: Dennis Martinez of the Montreal Expos pitches a perfect game to lead his team to a 2-0 victory over the Los Angeles Dodgers. Martinez was the first Latino ever to pitch a perfect game. The bottom three pictures are credited to AP Photo/Craig Fujii

On this day in Baseball History July 28, 1991: Dennis Martinez of the Montreal Expos pitches a perfect game to lead his team to a 2-0 victory over the Los Angeles Dodgers. Martinez was the first Latino ever to pitch a perfect game.

On this day in history July 28, 1868: Following its ratification by the necessary three-quarters of U.S. states, the 14th Amendment, guaranteeing to African Americans citizenship and all its privileges, is officially adopted into the U.S. Constitution.

On this day in July 28, 1914: Austria-Hungary declared war on Serbia after the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand by Gavrilo Princip a month before on June 28 in Sarajevo. World War I began as declarations of war by other European nations due to treaties and alliances quickly followed.

The bottom picture from a July 28, 1914, extra edition of the Wiener Zeitung, the official newspaper of the Austrian government, announcing that a state of war exists with Serbia. It is printed in both German and French. Translated to English:

The Royal Serbian Government not having answered in a satisfactory manner the note of July 23, 1914, presented by the Austro-Hungarian Minister at Belgrade, the Imperial and Royal Government are themselves compelled to see to the safeguarding of their rights and interests, and, with this object, to have recourse to force of arms.

Austria-Hungary consequently considers herself henceforward in state of war with Serbia.

todayinhistory

todayinhistory:

July 27th 1963: Garrett Morgan dies

On this day in 1963 the prominent African-American inventor Garrett Morgan died in Cleveland aged 86. Born in Kentucky in 1877 the seventh of eleven children and with only an elementary school education, Morgan went on to develop patents for several inventions. His patents included: a new sewing machine (his first job was as a sewing-machine mechanic); an improved traffic signal (he was the first black man in Cleveland to own a car); a hair-strengthening product; and a breathing device. His model of a breathing device, initially meant to help firefighters, went on to be used as the basis for gas masks in World War One. The hair-strengthening product he invented allowed him to start a business which sold these products to African-Americans - the G.A Morgan Hair Refining Company - which had great financial success. However, Morgan faced considerable racial prejudice throughout his career. Some refused to purchase his devices, which led Morgan to hire a white actor to pose as ‘the inventor’ when showcasing some of his inventions. After his heroism during the Cleveland Tunnel Explosion, when Morgan and his brother put on breathing devices and helped save some of the trapped workers, people realised he was African-American and sales of his products dropped. However after his patent of the traffic signal, which he sold to General Electric for $40,000 and provided the basis for the modern signal, he was honoured and respected by many in the business community. Garrett Morgan, who tirelessly supported the African-American community and whose inventions and personal heroism improved countless lives, died on July 27th 1963 in Cleveland.

On this day in July 27, 1963: prominent African-American inventor Garrett Morgan died in Cleveland aged 86. Morris had numerous patents including those for a hair-straightening product, a breathing device, a revamped sewing machine and an improved traffic signal. Racial views of the times kept Morgan from getting recognition of his inventions and achievements.

On this day in history July 27,1953: An armistice was signed at Panmunjom, ending the three years of fighting in the Korean War. 61 years later there still is no peace treaty signed between North and South Korea.

On this day in history July 26, 1948: President Harry Truman desegregated the United States armed forces by signing Executive Order 9981 which abolished racial discrimination in the military.